T&D Goes on Spring Break

Whose? by Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos

Whose? by Esmerelda Kosmatopoulos

The 2016 Spring Break Art Show has taken over the Skylight at Moynihan Station (aka the the dope historic post office on W. 33rd St) from March 1 – 7 (So you still can squeeze it in!). This year, the theme is ⌘COPY⌘PASTE:

21st Century repost culture, online and off, comes with an assortment of surplus advantages and unease. The carbon copy cultural more, factory-made commodity, or personal experience–whether a throw back Thursday or a woman of Algiers–is manhandled infinitely by status update opine, broadcast media soundbite and mental carbon copy. Imitation is the sincerest form of latter.

T&D hit Spring Break for the preview opening – here’s some art that caught my eye

David B. Smith

David B. Smith

David B. Smith‘s fabric works stemmed from his desire to move beyond photography. When I spoke to Smith, he told me that his digitally woven fabric wall hangings and floor sculptures came about when he became frustrated with the fragile nature of photos – Smith wanted art he could physically interact with without the fear of inflicting permanent damage. From there, his work has seen an evolution through an experimentation with the ways he can manipulate the fabric he creates.

Tridimensional Environmental Paintant #1 by Fabian Marcaccio

Tridimensional Environmental Paintant #1 by Fabian Marcaccio

Fabian Marcaccio’s “Paintants” (Painting + Mutant) are pictorial works that blend digital composing, digital printing, and, in some cases, 3D printing. His work in Spring Break is a full 3D printed environmental painting-sculpture that spans the 24 foot room, with intricate colored plastic and silicone parts swarming together in a suspended space. By forcing the viewer to walk beneath the sculpture to traverse the room, Marcaccio demands interaction with his piece. The intricacies of the work are unavoidable.

Nicole Reber

Nicole Reber

Signe Pierce, Cheap Thrills

Signe Pierce, Cheap Thrills

In an all female exhibition curated by Myla Delblesio, “You Can Call Me Baby”, works by Nicole Reber and Signe Pierce contribute to the cheeky nature of the show that gently mocks the concept of “femininity”. Along with a a room of flowers and cellophane by Logan White and a knitted blanket depicting a screenshot from a porn tube site by Erin Riley, it is clear that these ladies are using their art to redefine and reevaluate the modern “feminine mystique”. Spoiler alert: mystique is overrated. The women of “You Can Call Me Baby” are reclaiming concepts that are inherently female and seen as “lesser”, bringing to light the complexity of the modern woman.

Brendan Carroll

Brendan Carroll

L-R: Jon Rita, Brendan #3

L-R: Jon, Rita, Brendan #3

In an exhibition curated by Krista Saunders Scenna, Brendan Carroll’s polaroids from the “Money Shot” series combine staged portraits with typewritten anecdotes from Carroll. The portraits combine anecdote and subject to create a psuedo-fictional reality, slyly manipulating the line between art and real life.

(Check back soon to see an in depth discussion with Krista! She’s awesome.)

Cameron Dailey

Cameron Dailey

Cameron Dailey‘s hilarious and irreverent cards are like a Hallmark store for trolls. At Spring Break with Michelle Tillou, Dailey’s work is hung in a room covered in party streamers and is at the same time childlike and subversive, twisting expectations with a closer look.

Of course, this is only a small selection of the art at Spring Break – check out the show’s website to get a full look at all of the awesome curated exhibitions this year.